Attorney Serving The Chicago Suburbs

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Probate

When a person dies owning property, a representative may be needed to help transfer that property to their heirs or legatees. Special considerations may be needed for those who have become disabled due to injury or illness or for those who have not yet reached 18 years of age. The attorney provides assistance with probate orders including Letters of Office, Letters of Testamentary, Letters of Administration, Letters of Guardianship, and Small Estates Affidavits.

 

 

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Decedent’s Estates

When a person dies owning property a representative may be needed to transfer the property to his or her heirs [surviving family] or legatees [persons named in a will]. The representative, who is called an Executor or an Administrator, is appointed by a judge in the Probate Court who issues LETTERS OF OFFICE. More specifically titled LETTERS TESTAMENTARY or LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION

 
 
 

 
 

Disabled Person’s Estates

A person who is disabled due to injury, illness or not having reached the age of 18 years may also need a representative to transfer or receive property. The representative of a disabled person, who is called a Guardian, is also appointed by a judge in the Probate Court who issues LETTERS OF GUARDIANSHIP.

 
 
 

 
 

contested Estates

The following are some examples of issues that may be contested and therefore may have to be adjudicated by a Probate Judge:

Is a will valid or invalid?

Who should be appointed representative?

What property belongs in the estate?

Is a person disabled or not?

 
 
 

 
 

Small Estates Affidavit

A person who is disabled due to injury, illness or not having reached the age of 18 years may also need a representative to transfer or receive property. The representative of a disabled person, who is called a Guardian, is also appointed by a judge in the Probate Court who issues LETTERS OF GUARDIANSHIP.